Seattle Unity Sermon Videos 07-01-2018—”Threads that Connect Us”

Diane Robertson’s Sunday Sermon
“Threads that Connect Us”

Sunday Service Video July 1st, 2018—“Threads that Connect Us”—Here is the link and player to Diane Robertson’s Sunday sermon of 07-01-2018.

Every year, Rev. Karen Lindvig develops an annual theme for framing the sermon lessons for the year. In 2018, our Annual Theme is “The Inner Pilgrimage.” The sub-theme for July is about the benefits of feeling discomfort. Here, in her July 1st, 2018 “Threads that Connect Us” sermon, Diane describes how, in making our way by walking as a spiritual practice, it is essential to listen for the threads…(see more below)

Also, Stephanie Wood gives her reading titled “The Samaritan Woman.” (Details below.)

Stephanie Wood Reading—”The Samaritan Woman” from John Chapter 4

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Diane Robertson’s Sunday Sermon—”Threads that Connect Us”

Watch on YouTube

Sermon Summary

Title: “Threads that Connect Us”

http://seattleunity.org — Diane Robertson‘s sermon on July 1st, 2018 is titled “Threads that Connect Us.” Diane continues the series of sermons related to the 2018 Annual Theme called “The Inner Pilgrimage.” The sub-theme for July is about the benefits of feeling discomfort. Here, in her July 1st, 2018 “Threads that Connect Us” sermon, Diane describes how, in making our way by walking as a spiritual practice, it is essential to listen for the threads that weave through our lives and connect us to one another. These threads include synchronistic events, as well as celebrating the ideals that help us connect to one another and create a better future. Diane offers some intriguing, delightful personal stories that exemplify the connects that arise with people. She also reviews some of the key events that we are engaging in as we create a new church building on our site.

Quotations related to this sermon:

Sally Kempton:

This is a subtle energetic sensing, as if you’re a blind person moving along a road in the dark, trusting the road to unfold. There aren’t necessarily words or visions; it’s just that the path opens at certain points and you follow the openings…it’s a way of knowing that comes from the non-personal, intuitive level of awareness, and it’s usually worth following.

Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.:

We are caught in an inescapable network of mutuality, tied in a single garment of destiny. Whatever affects one directly, affects all indirectly.

Gordon Dveirin:

Spiritual community thrives on the balance of these two invisible principles of order—the irreducible value of our individual uniqueness and the harmonization of our differences through a shared orientation to the Source from which illumination flows.

Christine Valters Paintner:

We don’t need to travel long journeys to grow in the spiritual life. Wherever we are, we are called to stay in the monk’s cell, which means to stay present to our experience. As a culture we rarely acknowledge the value of being uncomfortable.

Key ideas related to this sermon:

  • The greatest thread that connects us is our Oneness, which is the truth of all people.
  • Independence Day reminds us to reflect on the threads that connect us as a nation and the ideals of our democracy, including the equality of all people, equal treatment and opportunity for all people.
  • We can strive to express this ideal by looking at healthy and harmful events in our past to help us take collective responsibility.

Reading by Stephanie Wood titled “The Samaritan Woman”

Stephanie Wood gives her reading titled “The Samaritan Woman” from John, Chapter 4.

John 4:4-10:

The Samaritan Woman

He [Jesus] had to pass through Samaria. So he came to a town of Samaria called Sychar, near the plot of land that Jacob had given to his son Joseph. Jacob’s well was there. Jesus, tired from his journey, sat down there at the well. It was about noon. A woman of Samaria came to draw water. Jesus said to her, “Give me a drink.” His disciples had gone into the town to buy food. The Samaritan woman said to him, “How can you, a Jew, ask me, a Samaritan woman, for a drink?” (For Jews use nothing in common with Samaritans.) Jesus answered and said to her, “If you knew the gift of God and who is saying to you, ‘Give me a drink,’ you would have asked him and he would have given you living water.”

https://www.biblegateway.com/passage/?search=John+4&version=NABRE

The flyer for this service is here:

https://seattleunity.org/wp-content/uploads/2018/06/oos-20180701.pdf