Seattle Unity Sunday Videos 01-22-2017—”We Were Made for These Times”

Sunday Service Videos January 22th, 2017—”We Were Made for These Times”—Here are the links and players to the music videos and sermon from 01-22-2017, with Diane Robertson’s sermon titled “We Were Made for These Times.”

Brian Emery Sings “For What It’s Worth”

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Erin McGaughan Sings “Stand for Love”

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Erin McGaughan Sings “Ma Chant”

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Erin McGaughan Sings “Better Way”

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Diane Robertson Sermon “We Were Made for These Times”

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Stephanie Emery Sings “Afterlife”

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SERMON SUMMARY

http://seattleunity.org—Diane Robertson offers her sermon “We Were Made for These Times.” She describes her experiences of and observations about the Woman’s March. Building on Rev. Karen Lindvig’s sermon the prior week for dealing with divisive times, Diane emphasizes how we may move forward with inspired action, centered in our hearts, towards positive changes, in these divisive times. She connects key Unity Principles to the actions needed in our times calling for speaking out and standing for waht we believe, without demonizing others. Diane described how we can see history and the future as an upward, progressing spiral in which we collectively protect those who have been marginalized while seeking to fulfill our highest values.

Key quotations related to this sermon:

Clarissa Pinkola Estes, “We Were Made for These Times”—“Ours is not the task of fixing the entire world all at once, but of stretching out to mend the part of the world that is within our reach. … It is not given to us to know which acts or by whom, will cause the critical mass to tip toward an enduring good. … Struggling souls catch light from other souls who are fully lit and willing to show it. If you would help to calm the tumult, this is one of the strongest tings you can do.”

Margot Lee Shetterly, “Hidden Figures”—“History is the sum total of what all of us do on a daily basis. We think of capital ‘H’ history as being these huge figures—George Washington, Alexander Hamilton, and Martin Luther King. Even so, she explains, ‘you go to bed at night, you wake up the next morning, and then yesterday is history.’ These small actions in some ways are more important or certainly as important as individual actions by these towering figures.”