Seattle Unity Sermon Video 10-29-2017—”After Life”

Sunday Service Video October 29th, 2017—“After Life”—Here is the link and player to the Rev. Karen Lindvig’s sermon from 10-29-2017. In this Sunday sermon, titled “After Life,“ Rev. Karen Lindvig elaborates on the Annual Theme of the Transformational Journey, by using the occasion of fall, All Saints Day and Halloween to explore the idea of the afterlife. She recounts her visit to tombstones Italy and recalls… (see more below)

 

Rev. Karen Lindvig Sermon “After Life”

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Sermon Summary

Title: After Life

http://seattleunity.org—In this Sunday sermon titled “After LIfe,“ Rev. Karen Lindvig elaborates on the Annual Theme of the Transformational Journey, by using the occasion of fall, All Saints Day and Halloween to explore the idea of the afterlife. She recounts her visit to tombstones Italy and recalls the image on many of them. She explores the views of life after death by many religious and spiritual traditions, including Buddhism; the Chinese Confucian tradition; Islam; and Christianity. She also explores the images of life-after-death found in literature such as Dante’s “Inferno”; Greek and Roman mythology. Then Karen visits the specific idea of reincarnation, including the beliefs of HInduism in the Bhagavad Gita, the Sikh religion, and the beliefs of Unity and Charles Fillmore. She concludes her sermon with a poem by James Dillet Freeman.

Two quotations related to this sermon:

Elisabeth Kübler-Ross, from “On Life After Death”:

“But at the time of transition, your guides, your guardian angels, people whom you have loved and who have passed on before you, will be there to help you. We have verified this beyond a shadow of a doubt, and I say this as a scientist. There will always be someone to help you with this transition.”

Alice Hoffman, from “The Probable Future”:

“Sheol or Hades is a place where there is no activity. However, since Augustine, Christians have believed that the souls of those who die either rest peacefully, in the case of Christians, or are afflicted, in the case of the damned, after death until the resurrection.

“… but where do we go? (Elinor asks)

” ‘I used to think there was a plan, a rough plan, but a plan all the same,’ the doctor admitted. ‘Now, I believe there are a thousand plans. Every breath, every decision, influences the plan, expands it, shortens it, twists it all around. It’s always changing. Those of us lucky enough to make it through the multitude of possible diseases and accidents get old. We get tired. We close our eyes.’

” ‘And then? Where are we then?’ (Elinor asks)

“Silly to ask him as though he knew, but in fact the doctor didn’t hesitate. He took Elinor’s hand and placed it on his chest, in the place where he knew his heart to be.

‘There.’

“Elinor smiled and thought, at last someone had told her the truth.”