Seattle Unity Sermon Video 10-15-2017—”Accepting Impermanence”

Sunday Service Video October 15th, 2017—“Accepting Impermanence”—Here is the link and player to the Rev. Karen Lindvig’s sermon from 10-15-2017 titled “Accepting Impermanence.” Special guests include Reggie Oliver who also speaks in the sermon. In this Sunday sermon Rev. Karen Lindvig elaborates on the Annual Theme of the Transformational Journey, by exploring the experience of accepting impermanence in our lives and our world. She relates this experience to the traditions of Buddhism, Hinduism and Christianity, as well as the… (see more below)

Rev. Karen Lindvig Sermon “Accepting Impermanence”

Watch on YouTube

Sermon Summary

Title: Accepting Impermanence

http://seattleunity.org—In this Sunday sermon titled “Accepting Impermanence“ Rev. Karen Lindvig elaborates on the Annual Theme of the Transformational Journey, by exploring the experience of accepting impermanence in our lives and our world. She relates this experience to the traditions of Buddhism, Hinduism and Christianity, as well as the metaphors of impermanence in day-to-day living. By showing how in Buddhism “non-attachment” is a key goal; and by showing that in Hinduism experiencing God is a key goal; and in Christianity “treasures in Heaven” (within) all elude to a suggested way to experience change, via that which is spiritually stable within. She elaborates further about experiencing the normality of change and impermanence with the story of creatures in the crystal river. Joining Karen, in the center of the sermon, is Reggie Oliver, who presents a brief overview of his experiences in Anguilla, an island recently hit by Hurricane Irma. Reggie talks about the peoples of the island, and the experiences he and others had as witnesses to the destructive power of Hurricane Irma. Rev. Karen concludes the sermon with a prayer on accepting impermanence.

Quotations related to this sermon:

Matthew 6:19-21: “Do not store up for yourselves treasures on Earth, where moth and rust consume and where thieves break in and steal; but store up for yourselves treasures in Heaven, where neither moth nor rust consumes and where thieves do not break in and steal. For where your treasure is, there your heart will be also.”

Paulo Coelho: “Anyone who has lost something they thought was theirs forever finally comes to realize that nothing really belongs to them.”

Gil Fronsdal: “The Buddha said that suffering arises when we cling. When clinging disappears, impermanence no longer gives rise to suffering. The solution to suffering, then, is to end clinging, not to try to escape from the transient world.”

Julie Forbes: “Impermanence is an overriding characteristic of life – it is a universal law. Big or small, everything in our life is constantly changing. Whether it is a sound that comes and goes, the loss of something or someone, or even our own body aging, each thing in life is fleeting. In contradiction, as human beings, we have the tendency to seek security. We try to make things in our life stable and solid—even if this is an illusion. Failure to acknowledge the truth of change is a source of suffering in our lives, a source of conflict.”

Ven Bhikkhu: “The notion of impermanence (anicca) forms the bedrock for the Buddha’s teaching, having been the initial insight that impelled the Bodhisattva to leave the palace in search of a path to enlightenment.”

Prayer of Accepting Impermanence:

May I experience peace amid the changes in my life.
May I experience peace amid the changes in other’s lives.

Talent Links

Credits