Seattle Unity Sermon Video 09-03-2017—”The Call of the Promised Land”

Sunday Service Video September 3rd, 2017—”The Call of the Promised Land”—Here is the link and player to the Rev. Karen Lindvig’s sermon from 09-03-2017 titled “The Call of the Promised Land.” In this Sunday sermon titled “The Call of the Promised Land,” Rev. Karen Lindvig elaborates on the Annual Theme of the Transformational Journey by exploring the story of Exodus in the Old Testament. Karen recounts the story of Exodus, a story that is usually shared in the spring and Passover. She explores how the call to the Promised Land… (see more below)

Rev. Karen Lindvig Sermon “The Call of the Promised Land”

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http://seattleunity.org—In this Sunday sermon titled “The Call of the Promised Land,” Rev. Karen Lindvig elaborates on the Annual Theme of the Transformational Journey by exploring the story of Exodus in the Old Testament. Karen recounts the story of Exodus, a story that is usually shared in the spring and Passover. She explores how the call to the Promised Land is one that we experience many times in our lives. Sometimes in big ways—and sometimes in small ways. The big ways include recent events in Houston, Texas where thousands of people have had a forced Exodus thrust upon them due to Hurricane Harvey.

Karen then recalls how the Exodus story goes deep and calls for our reflection with a review. Her review included:

1. The Egyptians were concerned that the Hebrew people might rise up against them because there were more of them.
2. A decree stated that baby boys would be put to death, but girls could live.
3. A Hebrew woman had a son and put him in a basket on the river to save his life.
4. The Pharaoh’s daughter pulled him from the water. She named him Moses because “I drew him out of the water.”
5. He grew up in Pharaoh’s household and one day saw the mistreatment of his people.
6. He heard the call.
7. And so began the beginning of the Exodus.

Then Karen describes a metaphysical interpretation typical of the Unity movement, one that tells the story of our soul’s journey.

1. Traditionally Egypt has come to represent material consciousness – separation – I’m in it for me.
2. Sharid Abduallah calls this: “breaker consciousness”.
3. Perhaps we wake up one day in a state of spiritual bankruptcy and realize that the consciousness of separation and materialism has led to suffering.
4. The Israelites metaphysically represent spiritual consciousness as so you are “called out” to another place.
5. When was the first time you were called out of your own personal Egypt into the Promised Land?
6. When you knew there was more?

Karen went to explore how the story of Exodus relates to the Hero’s Journey for each of us as individuals and for our spiritual community as we rebuild our church building; deal with climate breakdowns such as the fires raging that darken our skies on the West coast from Seattle to L.A. Karen also describes many good things people are doing to solve the problems we face, and reiterated that we have much, much more to accomplish.

Quotations related to this sermon:

Exodus 3:7-8: “Then the LORD said, “I have observed the misery of my people who are in Egypt; I have heard their cry on account of their taskmasters. Indeed, I know their sufferings, and I have come down to deliver them from the Egyptians, and to bring them up out of that land to a good and broad land, a land flowing with milk and honey.”

Timothy Eagen of the New York Times: “I felt small and very helpless weeks ago, when smoke from a surfeit of Canadian wildfires smothered Seattle. For several days, the air quality was worse than Beijing’s. I fled to a mountain summit in the Cascades, looking for the natural air-conditioning that usually flows in from the Pacific. No amount of bluster or wealth or denial could buy you a cleaner breath of air in the city for those few days. From Bill Gates to the homeless woman sleeping under the freeway overpass, we were stuck in that bowl of awful air together.”

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