Seattle Unity Easter Sunday Videos 04-16-2017—”Breaking Through”

Easter Sunday Service Videos April 16, 2017—”Breaking Through”—Here are the links and players to the music videos and sermon from 04-16-2017, with Rev. Karen Lindvig’s sermon titled “Breaking Through.” In this Easter Sunday sermon titled “Breaking Through,” Rev. Karen Lindvig recounts the story of Jesus on Easter Sunday, as a parable for all people for times when they need to break through into an enhanced consciousness. Consistent with the theme of April 2017—”Breaking Through”—Rev. Karen describes the Easter story of the death, entombment, and resurrection of Jesus. (More details are below.)

 

Erin McGaughan Sings “Processional In Paradisum”

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Seattle Unity Choir Sings “Lazarus”

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Seattle Unity Choir Sings “Christ the Lord is Risen Today”

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Seattle Unity Choir Sings “Hallelu”

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Erin McGaughan Sings “Jacob’s Ladder”

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Seattle Unity Choir Sings “I’ll Rise”

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Rev. Karen Lindvig Easter Sermon “Breaking Through”

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Seattle Unity Choir Sings “Let Everything that Hath Breath”

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Seattle Unity Choir Sings “Let It Be” along with Service Blessings & Closing

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SERMON SUMMARY

http://seattleunity.org—In this Easter Sunday sermon titled “Breaking Through,” Rev. Karen Lindvig recounts the story of Jesus on Easter Sunday, as a parable for all people, for times when they need to break through into an enhanced consciousness. Consistent with the theme of April 2017—”Breaking Through”—Rev. Karen describes the Easter story of the death, entombment, and resurrection of Jesus. She traces the history of the holiday of Easter including the return of spring, the rise, fall and rise again of Jesus; how the story of death and rebirth is a universal story each of us embodies in our life; and how understanding the story enables us to grow and further the evolution of our personal and collective consciousness for each of us individually, and for Humanity.

 

Quotations related to this Easter sermon:

Mark 16:1-7:  When the Sabbath was over, Mary Magdalene, Mary the mother of James, and Salome bought spices so that they might go to anoint Jesus’ body. Very early on the first day of the week, just after sunrise, they were on their way to the tomb and they asked each other, “Who will roll the stone away from the entrance of the tomb?” But when they looked up, they saw that the stone, which was very large, had been rolled away. As they entered the tomb, they saw a young man dressed in a white robe sitting on the right side, and they were alarmed. “Don’t be alarmed,” he said. “You are looking for Jesus the Nazarene, who was crucified. He has risen! He is not here. See the place where they laid him.  But go, tell his disciples and Peter, ‘He is going ahead of you into Galilee. There you will see him, just as he told you.’”

Jean Houston: “The resurrection story of Jesus differs radically from that of the traditional mystery cult figures. By being historical, by living a human existence in space and time, Jesus brought a new dimension, that of human experience, to the trans personal and archetypal dimension of God-Identity. Indeed, the power of this principle was so strong that it re-ordered that cold flesh to warm life, and brought into the world a spirit of renewal that had never been known before. How was this accomplished? This implies that a new order has been created within spirit, within nature, within the soul, within the meaning and matter of history. Here we move out beyond miracle into the heart of mystery and consciousness grows into the capacity for co-creation with God. The world turns a corner and true partnership between divine and human realms becomes possible. We long for the call: ‘Arise, Maiden, Madam, Sir, Doctor. Arise! Arise!’ We long for resurrection and we refuse to believe the signs that it may already by in our midst. Resurrected ones are walking among us.”